Moroccan Chicken Tagine

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According to Wikipedia, Moroccan Cuisine has long been considered one of the most diversified cuisines in the world.  It’s influenced by Morocco’s interactions and exchanges with other cultures; typically a mix of Mediterranean, Berber, Arab, Moorish, Middle Eastern, African, Iberian and Jewish influences.  Moroccan food is extensively spiced with the likes of cinnamon, cumin, turmeric, paprika, coriander, saffron, fennel, nutmeg, oregano and cayenne pepper.

Many Moroccan dishes take their name from a tagine, the clay or cast iron vessel in which they were traditionally cooked.  Tagines are used by those who appreciate the unique, slow-cooked flavor when making stews; often lamb or chicken along with vegetables, golden raisins and olives.  Most often a tagine is served with couscous, the old national delicacy of Morocco.According to Wikipedia, Moroccan Cuisine has long been considered one of the most diversified cuisines in the world.  It’s influenced by Morocco’s interactions and exchanges with other cultures; typically a mix of Mediterranean, Berber, Arab, Moorish, Middle Eastern, African, Iberian and Jewish influences.  Moroccan food is extensively spiced with the likes of cinnamon, cumin, turmeric, paprika, coriander, saffron, fennel, nutmeg, oregano and cayenne pepper.

Many Moroccan dishes take their name from a tagine, the clay or cast iron vessel in which they were traditionally cooked.  Tagines are used by those who appreciate the unique, slow-cooked flavor when making stews; often lamb or chicken along with vegetables, golden raisins and olives.  Most often a tagine is served with couscous, the old national delicacy of Morocco.

Chicken Tagine
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Adapted from Daniel Boulud recipes, Elle Decor. This dish is a menage a trois to your tongue, taste buds and tummy, enjoy!
Servings
4 people
Servings
4 people
Chicken Tagine
BigOven - Save recipe or add to grocery list
Yum
Print Recipe
Adapted from Daniel Boulud recipes, Elle Decor. This dish is a menage a trois to your tongue, taste buds and tummy, enjoy!
Servings
4 people
Servings
4 people
Ingredients
Spice Mix
  • 3 tbsp paprika
  • 2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 3/4 tsp ground allspice
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne
Tagine
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 6 whole chicken drumsticks
  • salt to taste
  • 1 white onion cut into 6 wedges
  • cloves garlic minced
  • 1/2 head cauliflower cut into small florets
  • 2 carrots peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 fennel bulb cut into 6 wedges
  • 1/2 cup tomato paste
  • pinch safron
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 2 cups kale green leaves only, packed tightly
  • 1/2 cup green olives
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins
  • 1 lemon peel from lemon, minced
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Preheat a large, shallow saute pan over medium-high heat and add half the olive oil. Rub the chicken with 1/3 of the spice mix and sprinkle with salt; sear the pieces on all sides until golden brown, about 10 minutes.
  2. Remove the chicken and set aside. Turn off the heat, but reserve the pan with the leftover oil and chicken fat.
  3. In a 14 to 16 inch tagine or 5 quart dutch oven set over medium high heat, warm the remaining olive oil and add the onion and garlic. Reduce the heat to just below medium and cook, stirring, for about 10 minutes.
  4. While the onion cooks, return the saute pan to medium-high heat and saute the cauliflower, carrots, and fennel, separately, until tender-crisp, seasoning each batch with salt to taste and adding it to the tagine. Once all the vegetables have been added, mix in the tomato paste, remaining spice mix and safron. Add chicken stock and cook for 2 minutes, stirring gently.
  5. Arrange the chicken on top of the vegetables in the tagine and bring to a simmer; cover and bake in the oven for 20 minutes.
  6. Remove from the oven; add kale, olives, raisins and lemon peel. Return to the oven for another 20-30 minutes, until the chicken is cooked through and tender. Adjust the salt to taste.
  7. Serve over couscous or quinoa.
Recipe Notes

I received my first tagine vessel from my daughter about 10 years ago.  Receiving a unique cooking piece like this forced me out of my cooking comfort zone and caused me to stretch my palate into a cuisine I might not otherwise experimented with.  I now own two different size tagines and have made this Moroccan stew with everything from chicken to pork, beef and lamb.  Of course you don't need a tagine to make this decadent dish but should you like to look into purchasing a tagine I recommend either the clay version from Emile Henry  or the cast iron tagine from Le Creuset, I own both and really only favor one over the other when it comes down to size...my Emile Henry is the one I use when I'm serving guests because it's a bit larger.

Moroccan food ranks high on lists of the world's best cuisines and is well worth exploring.  You won't be disappinted with the incredible variety, exotic seasoning and complex ingredient combinations that await you.

Enjoy!

Lynn

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