Vintage Cookbooks

Vintage Cookbooks
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I’ve been in the process of cleaning out closets lately as I make room for my daughter, her hub and children who will be moving in with me while their new home is being built.  The panic of chaos I’m about to undergo prompted the urge organize before Lynn plus four converges on the homecienda.  One closet in particular caused me to pause, it’s the one where I store dad’s favorite cookbooks, I took the time and paged through a few.  I especially like the ones created at his work. These are the tried and true recipes from people he worked side by side with, friends and neighbors so you knew the end result was going to be nummy.  Be sure and slide through the photos, you just might see someone you know![shareprints gallery_id=”4834″ gallery_type=”slider” gallery_position=”pos_center” gallery_width=”width_100″ image_size=”small” image_padding=”0″ theme=”dark” image_hover=”false” lightbox_type=”slide” titles=”true” captions=”true” descriptions=”true” comments=”true” sharing=”true”]What fun finding recipes from the past and seeing names of people I hadn’t thought about in decades.

I dug further into the Rubbermaid tub and came across decades of New Ulm Journal cookbooks.  Oh the fun I had paging through these and witnessed how our taste buds and culinary skills changed over the years.  You can see how much my mom and dad enjoyed these cookbooks by the many notes on the front cover.[shareprints gallery_id=”4847″ gallery_type=”slider” gallery_position=”pos_center” gallery_width=”width_100″ image_size=”small” image_padding=”0″ theme=”dark” image_hover=”false” lightbox_type=”slide” titles=”true” captions=”true” descriptions=”true” comments=”true” sharing=”true”]It was funny to see how kitchen appliances and low-calorie recipes influenced a new section in the cookbook like Microwave Dishes and Crockpot Cookery.  [shareprints gallery_id=”4851″ gallery_type=”slider” gallery_position=”pos_center” gallery_width=”width_100″ image_size=”small” image_padding=”0″ theme=”dark” image_hover=”false” lightbox_type=”slide” titles=”true” captions=”true” descriptions=”true” comments=”true” sharing=”true”]Our hometown newspaper special edition cookbook must have been a sure bet for successful advertising because it was chock full of ads geared toward the housewife.  These ads just cracked me up![shareprints gallery_id=”4856″ gallery_type=”slider” gallery_position=”pos_center” gallery_width=”width_100″ image_size=”small” image_padding=”0″ theme=”dark” image_hover=”false” lightbox_type=”slide” titles=”true” captions=”true” descriptions=”true” comments=”true” sharing=”true”]  Even the local telephone provider got in on the action.  I can’t for the life of me recall what an extension phone was.  Simply a second phone in the house?  Oh how times have changed![shareprints gallery_id=”4864″ gallery_type=”masonry” gallery_position=”pos_center” gallery_width=”width_100″ image_size=”small” image_padding=”0″ theme=”dark” image_hover=”false” lightbox_type=”slide” titles=”true” captions=”true” descriptions=”true” comments=”true” sharing=”true”]Growing up in a predominantly German community they were proud of their heritage and the cookbooks included plenty of Bavarian favorites.[shareprints gallery_id=”4867″ gallery_type=”slider” gallery_position=”pos_center” gallery_width=”width_100″ image_size=”small” image_padding=”0″ theme=”dark” image_hover=”false” lightbox_type=”slide” titles=”true” captions=”true” descriptions=”true” comments=”true” sharing=”true”]And if you preferred to have the recipe explained to you, you could always listen to Doris Aufderheide on KNUJ.  Doris was a local celebrity who drew an audience for miles around as women gathered around radios to listen to Doris’ unique and deliberate delivery.  Oh how I dreamed of being a homemaker![shareprints gallery_id=”4870″ gallery_type=”slider” gallery_position=”pos_center” gallery_width=”width_100″ image_size=”small” image_padding=”0″ theme=”dark” image_hover=”false” lightbox_type=”slide” titles=”true” captions=”true” descriptions=”true” comments=”true” sharing=”true”]Even our local dairy and finest dining restaurant advertised.[shareprints gallery_id=”4873″ gallery_type=”slider” gallery_position=”pos_center” gallery_width=”width_100″ image_size=”small” image_padding=”0″ theme=”dark” image_hover=”false” lightbox_type=”slide” titles=”true” captions=”true” descriptions=”true” comments=”true” sharing=”true”]When I came across the ad for the Kaiserhoff it got me wondering if I could locate the recipe for that wonderfully tangy Kaiserhoff BBQ Sauce in dad’s treasured recipe collection and sure enough, there it was in dad’s recipe box.[shareprints gallery_id=”4876″ gallery_type=”masonry” gallery_position=”pos_center” gallery_width=”width_100″ image_size=”medium” image_padding=”0″ theme=”dark” image_hover=”false” lightbox_type=”slide” titles=”true” captions=”true” descriptions=”true” comments=”true” sharing=”true”]The New Ulm Journal cookbooks had a recipe for every occasion where you might need to bring a dish to pass…Prune and Cheese Cake will sure to win you friends!  [shareprints gallery_id=”4878″ gallery_type=”slider” gallery_position=”pos_center” gallery_width=”width_100″ image_size=”small” image_padding=”0″ theme=”dark” image_hover=”false” lightbox_type=”slide” titles=”true” captions=”true” descriptions=”true” comments=”true” sharing=”true”]Then I moved on to other favored cookbooks loaded with notations of additions and substitutions.  I clearly am my father’s daughter and never make a recipe as written.  I wondered if he ever talked to the individual who submitted the recipe and told them how he’d perfected it.  [shareprints gallery_id=”4884″ gallery_type=”slider” gallery_position=”pos_center” gallery_width=”width_100″ image_size=”small” image_padding=”0″ theme=”dark” image_hover=”false” lightbox_type=”slide” titles=”true” captions=”true” descriptions=”true” comments=”true” sharing=”true”]All of these hometown recipes got me thinking I should host a dinner party before my daughter and family come to stay.  It will be a simple dinner party based around a theme, at the moment my mood is swinging to a 1960’s party since I came across dad’s cookbooks.  Classic cocktails and punch along with old school appetizers and entrée.  Sounds fun doesn’t it?  Who doesn’t love those beef, pickle and cream cheese roll-ups and bundt cake for dessert?  I can’t wait to fine tune the menu and start the guest list.  Of course since I’ll be using hometown recipes as the foundation of my party I may have to invite some hometown friends too!

Oh my, I’m beginning to feel the social-barometric pressure rising, this is going to be fun!

For most of us, storage space is precious but you can always find a corner for a few of your old family  cookbooks.   There’s just something about those old recipes, we need to preserve them and the memories that made family dinners so special.  I can smell the aroma coming out of the kitchen just thinking about it.

Don’t let modern technology become your recipe book, savor the past by creating meals that were not only tasty but included interesting ingredients, like prunes.

Enjoy!

Lynn

 

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7 thoughts on “Vintage Cookbooks”

  • Yes, those advertisement were quite enjoyable! Thank you for the book suggestion, I’ll be sure and check it out. What fun that 60’s party will be, I will definitely be the whirling hostess, with the mostest!

  • Thank you, Debra! In many ways I’m finding I’m a bit of a vintage soul. So many great memories to hang onto from the 60’s and yes, that does include a vintage apron!

  • Enjoyed your dad’s ‘vintage’ cookbooks and the advertisements. Yes, extension phones were additional phones with shared lines. Quite trendy at the time.
    Thought you might enjoy this latest release.
    ‘Kitchens of the Great Midwest’: Just something J. Ryan Stradal whipped up – LA Times
    http://www.latimes.com/books/jacketcopy/la-ca-jc-j-ryan-stradal-20150726-story.html
    Looking forward to your posting on the ’60s’ party….pointy toe, spiked heels with vintage apron and whirling hostess, with the mostest!
    Debra

  • Thank you, Pamela, I’m glad you enjoyed it! Secret family recipes have always intrigued me, if it’s good, why keep it secret?

  • Priceless!! I have a few myself as well as recipes I won’t share…family secrets. Love collecting those old cookbooks. You’ve got quite the collection.

    Thanks for sharing Lynn.

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